Meridian 2018

author: Tarus Balog

It is hard to believe that our first release of OpenNMS Meridian was over three years ago.

Meridian Logo

We were struggling with trying to balance the needs of a support organization with the open source desire to “release early, release often”. How do you deal with wanting to be as cutting edge as possible but to support customers who really need a stable platform? We did have a “development” release, but no one really used it.

Our answer was to model OpenNMS on Red Hat, the most successful open source company in existence. While Red Hat has hundreds of products, their main offering is Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). This is derived, in large part, from the Fedora Linux distribution. New things hit Fedora first and, once vetted, make their way into RHEL.

We decided to do the same thing with OpenNMS. OpenNMS was split into two main branches: Horizon and Meridian. Horizon was the Fedora equivalent, while Meridian was modeled on RHEL.

This has been very successful. While we were averaging a new major OpenNMS release every 18 months, now we do three or four Horizon releases per year. Tons of new features are hitting Horizon, from the ability to deal with telemetry data, new correlation features to condense alarms into “situations” based on unsupervised machine learning, to the first steps toward a microservices architecture.

We do our best to release code as production-ready as possible. Our users are very creative and use OpenNMS in unique ways. By offering up rapid Horizon releases it allows us to find and fix issues quickly and work out how to best implement new functionality.

But what about our users who are more interested in stability than the “new shiny”? They needed a system that was rock solid and easy to maintain. That’s why we created Meridian. Meridian lags Horizon on features but by the time a feature hits Meridian, it has been tested thoroughly and can immediately be deployed into production.

There is one major Meridian release a year, with usually three or four point updates. Anyone who has ever upgraded OpenNMS understands that dealing with configuration file changes can be problematic. With Meridian, moving from one point release to another rarely changes configuration, so upgrades can happen in minutes and users can rest assured that their systems are up to date and secure. Each Meridian release is supported for three years.

There is a cost associated with using Meridian. Similar to RHEL, it is offered as a subscription. While still 100% open source, you pay a fee to access the update servers, and the idea is that you are paying for the effort it takes to refine Horizon into Meridian and get the most stable version of OpenNMS possible. We are so convinced that Meridian is worth it, it is available without having to buy a support contract. Meridian users get access to OpenNMS Connect, which is a forum for asking questions about using Meridian.

It seems like it was just yesterday that we did this but it has now been over three years. That means support will sunset on Meridian 2015 at the end of the year. Never fear, the latest releases are just as stable and even more feature rich.

The main feature in Meridian 2018 is support for the OpenNMS Minion. The Minion is a stateless application that allows for remote distribution of OpenNMS functionality. For example, I used to run an OpenNMS instance at my house to monitor my devices. Now I just have a Minion. Even though my network is not reachable from our production OpenNMS instance, the Minion allows me to test service availability, and well as collect data and traps, and then forward them on to the main application. The Minion itself is stateless – it connects to a messaging broker on the OpenNMS server in order to get its list of tasks.

A Minion is defined by its “Location”. You can have multiple Minions for a given location and they will access the broker via a “competitive consumer queue”. This way if a particular Minion goes down, there can be another to do the work. By default OpenNMS ships with ActiveMQ as the broker, but it is also possible to use an external Kafkainstance as well. Kafka can be clustered for both load balancing and reliability, and the combination of a Kafka cluster and multiple Minions can make the amount of devices OpenNMS monitors virtually limitless (we are working on a proof of concept for one user with over 8 million discreet devices).

There are a number of other features in Meridian 2018, so check out the release notesfor more details. It is an exciting addition to the OpenNMS product line.

(originally posted on Adventures in OSS here: https://www.adventuresinoss.com/2018/09/24/meridian-2018/)

By |2018-09-27T18:47:07+00:00September 27th, 2018|Categories: Blog|Tags: , |0 Comments

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